globe
  1. Unit Owner 13 items
    1. Prof Martin Gainsborough

      Phone:  0117 331 0851

      Email:  martin.gainsborough@bristol.ac.uk

      Office:  G1, 3 Priory Road

      Unit owner office hours:  Wednesday 11-12pm and Thursday 10-11am

      Scheduled office hours do not run during reading weeks, though you can still contact tutors for advice by email and to arrange individual appointments.

    2. Seminar tutor 1 item
      1. Sam Appleton

        Email:  sam.appleton@bristol.ac.uk

        Office hours:  Thursday, 2-4pm

        Location:  G.03, 3 Priory Road

    3. Unit details 1 item
      1. Level: 1/5

        Credit points: 20

        Prerequisites: None

        Curriculum area: Comparative and National Politics

    4. Timetabled classes 1 item
      1. Lectures:  Tuesday 4-5pm in Priory Road Complex: A Block: 0A1 and Wednesday 10-11am in Arts Complex:  Villa 21 Woodland Road:  Lecture Room 8.

        Seminars:  The time and location of your seminar will be available on your personal timetable.  You are expected to attend ONE seminar each week.  Your online personal timetable will inform you to which group you have been allocated.  Seminar groups are fixed:  you are not alowed to change seminar groups without permission from the office.

        Weeks 18 and 24 are Reading Weeks; there is NO regular teaching in these weeks.

        In addition to timetabled sessions there is a requirement for private study, reading, revision and assessments.

        Reading the essential readings in advance of each seminar is the minimum expectation.  The University Guidelines state that one credit point is broadly equivalent to 10 hours of total student input.

    5. Learning outcomes 1 item
      1. Upon completing the unit the student will have developed the following:

        • An understanding of the way in which the theory and practice of development has evolved since 1945;
        • An ability to adopt a critical position in relation to different ways of thinking about and doing development;
        • An understanding of the politics and ethical conundrums associated with different approaches to development pursued by local, national and global actors.

         

    6. Requirements for passing the unit 1 item
        • Satisfactory attendance at seminars;
        • Completion of all formative work to an acceptable standard;
        • Attainment of a composite mark of all summative work to a passing standard (40 or above)

         

    7. Details of coursework and deadlines 1 item
      1. Summative assessment: Country report, Word count: 2000 words, Weighting: 25%, Deadline: 9.30am, 23/02/2018, Day: Friday, Week: 17

        Summative assessment:  Essay, Word count: 2000 words, Weighting: 75%, Deadline: 9.30am, 17/05/2018, Day: Thursday, Week: SE2

        Formative assessment: Presentation, Word count: n/a, Weighting: 0%, Deadline: In class.  PLEASE NOTE THAT SATISFACTORY COMPLETION OF YOUR PRESENTATION IS A REQUIREMENT FOR CREDIT POINTS.

        Summative essay questions will be made available on the SPAIS UG Admin Blackboard site

        • Instructions for the submission of coursework can be found in Appendix A;
        • Assessment in the school is subject to strict penalties regarding late submission, plagiarism and maximum word count.  A summary of key regulations is in Appendix B;
        • Marking criteria can be found in Appendix C.

    8. Keeping in touch 1 item
      1. Make sure you check your Bristol email account regularly throughout the course as important information will be communicated to you. Any emails sent to your Bristol address are assumed to have been read. If you wish for emails to be forwarded to an alternative address then please go to https://wwws.cse.bris.ac.uk/cgi-bin/redirect-mailname-external   

    9. Group presentation 1 item
      1. All students will be responsible for one 10-12 minute group presentations.  This is essential preparation for your written work, and gives you an opportunity to articulate and try out ideas prior to putting pen to paper.  For the presentation, each seminar class will be divided into six small groups.  You will be told which presentation you are doing on which date in class.  Presentations will take place in the seminar class in Weeks 15, 19 and 21. 

         

         

        Details of what each presentation involves can be found under the relevant weeks below between the Essential and Further reading.

    10. Country report 1 item
      1. You are required to write a 2000 word country report on a country of your choice, including some basic historical, political, economic and social data, and an assessment of some of the key development issues as they pertain to your chosen country.

        The aim of this exercise is to help you develop some country knowledge that can be deployed in seminar discussions and in your essay and provide an empirical basis against which to assess the theoretical issues addressed in the unit.

        The onus on you is to track down relevant material through innovative use of the library, e-journals and the internet.

        We will do significant amounts of work in class relating to the country report, including looking at how to structure the report and issues relating to data collection and its use. 

    11. Level descriptors for the country report 1 item
      1. A first class piece of work is likely to show considerable strengths in its content and in the range of sources used in it.  The author will demonstrate abilities to synthesise the relevant material (academic and policy), to reach evaluative conclusions, and to make critical judgements in the development of her or his analysis. The author may demonstrate creative and imaginative skills which considerably enhance the report's insights.  The piece of work will draw on the most relevant material and be structured in a fashion which ensures the report offers an in-depth, holistic and thought-provoking picture of the country's development challenges and prospects.  The report will be well presented with a bibliography whilst written in a clear and literate style.

        An upper second class piece of work will show an ability to be selective in the material assembled by the author.  It is likely to employ a reasonable range of sources.  It will offer an insightful picture of the country's development challenges and prospects, deploying some analytical skills. It will be well presented with a bibliography whilst written in a clear and literate style.

        A lower second class piece of work will demonstrate an ability to reproduce, in précis form, a relatively narrow range of sources.  It may fail to discern between relevant and non-relevant material.  The focus of the report will be on description and few analytical skills will be deployed in the assessment of the country's development challenges and prospects.  The analysis may lack structure and coherence.  It will be well presented with a bibliography whilst written, for the most part, in a clear and literate style.  Reports which regurgitate material from a narrow range of sources are likely to be marked as lower second class pieces of work, even if they have strengths in other areas.

        A third class piece of work will indicate little critical awareness of the issues relating to the country's development challenges and prospects and be based on poor reproduction of the basic sources.  It will include irrelevant material and deploy hardly any analytical skills.  It will be presented with a bibliography whilst written, for the most part, in a clear and literate style.

        A fail will demonstrate so low a level of understanding, awareness of sources and ability to relate what material there is in relation to the country's development challenges and prospects that it is not of sufficient standard to merit a degree of any kind.  Work that is plagiarised also ranks as a fail as does work that relies on material from a single text in an uncritical fashion. Work that is poorly presented without a bibliography and that lacks basic literate standards may also fail.

    12. Essay 1 item
      1. You are required to write a 2000 word assessed essay for this unit. 

        As with the country report, we will spend a significant amount of time in class talking about how to approach the different essays.

    13. Reading for this unit 1 item
      1. There is no core text for this unit.  Instead, you are encouraged to read as widely as possible, starting with the essential reading allocated for each week before branching out to the furthe reading.  Please note that a reading list is only ever a first guide to a subject.  You will do best if you follow your own interests and lines of enquiry, using this reading list as a point of departure only.  It is worth keeping an eye on journals – some of which are listed below.  This will ensure that you are tapping into the latest thinking in the field. 

         

        Journals covering issues in Development Studies include the following:

         

        Conflict, Security and Development

        Development and Change

        European Journal of Development Studies

        Journal of Development Studies

        Millennium

        New Political Economy

        Review of International Political Economy

        Security Dialogue

        Third World Quarterly

        World Development

  2. Week 13. The nature of the subject 31 items
    1. Learning outcome: To understand the scope of the unit and to consider some of the political and ethical conundrums associated with 'doing' development.

    2. Essential reading 6 items
      Here, we are interested in how different people talk about development. After the very first reading, compare and contrast the next three texts below. What similarities and differences do you notice? There are then two more essential readings: one on taking care with the language we use in development and the other on popular culture and development.
    3. Further reading 24 items
      The literature below allows you to explore further the issues covered above, namely definitions, language, popular culture and development
      1.  

        Definitions, context

      2. The history of development: from Western origins to global faith - Gilbert Rist, dawsonera 2008 (electronic resource)

        Book Further Chapter 1

      3. Politics and development: a critical introduction - Olle Törnquist 1999

        Book Further Chapters 1 and 2

      4. Society, state and market: a guide to competing theories of development - John Martinussen 1997

        Book Further Chapters 1-3

      5. The new regional politics of development - Anthony Payne 2004

        Book Further Chapter 1

      6. Development, security and unending war: governing the world of peoples - Mark R. Duffield 2007

        Book  Chapters 1, 5 and 9

      7. Understanding development: issues and debates - Paul Hopper 2012

        Book Further Chapter 10

      8.  

        The language of development (third world, global south etc)

         

      9.  

        Celebrities, popular culture and development

  3. Week 14. Modernisation vs Dependency 282 items
    1. Learning Outcome:  To understand the origins of what we call 'development', the ideas associated with modernisation theory and dependency theory, including their potential relevance today

    2. Essential reading 4 items
      These readings give you insights into what modernisation and dependency theory say and there are two texts focusing on how we might think about the relevance of these theories today.
      1. Understanding development: issues and debates - Paul Hopper 2012

        Book Essential pp. 3-7 and 30-39

      2. The history of development: from Western origins to global faith - Gilbert Rist, dawsonera 2008 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential Chapters 6 and 7

    3. Further reading 42 items
      Below are more readings on modernisation and dependency theory along with material on Afghanistan and China in Africa, which offer case studies by which we can assess the relevance of modernisation theory (Afghanistan) and dependency theory (China in Africa) today. Of course, these are just two case studies among many possibilities.
      1. Historical roots of development

      2. History of development: from western origins to global faith - Gilbert Rist 2008

        Book Further Chapter 2

      3. Modernisation theory

      4. Globalization and the postcolonial world: the new political economy of development - Ankie M. M. Hoogvelt 2001

        Book Further Chapter 2, especially pp, 34-37

      5. The rise & fall of development theory - Colin Leys 1996

        Book Further Chapter 3

      6. Development theory: an introduction - P. W. Preston 1996

        Book Further Chapter 9

      7. Society, state and market: a guide to competing theories of development - John Martinussen 1997

        Book Further Chapter 5

      8. Political change and underdevelopment: a critical introduction to Third World politics - Vicky Randall, Robin Theobald 1985

        Book Further Chapter 1

      9. Politics and development: a critical introduction - Olle Törnquist 1999

        Book Further Chapters 5 and 6

      10. Modernisation theorists in their own words

      11. From modernization to globalization: perspectives on development and social change - J. Timmons Roberts, Amy Hite 2000

        Book Further Walt Rostow 'The Stages of Economic Growth', pp. 100-109

      12. From modernization to globalization: perspectives on development and social change - J. Timmons Roberts, Amy Hite 2000

        Book Further Samuel Huntington 'The Change to Change' (1971) and 'Political Order in Changing Societies (1968), pp. 144-156

      13. Modernisation theory today, including a focus on Afghanistan

      14. Development, security and unending war: governing the world of peoples - Mark R. Duffield 2007

        Book  'Afghanistan, Coherence and Taliban Rule', pp. 133-158.

      15. Dependency theory

      16. Globalization and the postcolonial world: the new political economy of development - Ankie M. M. Hoogvelt 2001

        Book Further Chapter 2, pp. 37-42

      17. The rise & fall of development theory - Colin Leys 1996

        Book Further Chapter 2

      18. Society, state and market: a guide to competing theories of development - John Martinussen 1997

        Book Further Chapters 6-7

      19. Development theory: an introduction - P. W. Preston 1996

        Book Further Chapter 10

      20. Political change and underdevelopment: a critical introduction to Third World politics - Vicky Randall, Robin Theobald 1985

        Book Further Chapter 4

      21. Politics and development: a critical introduction - Olle Törnquist 1999

        Book Further Chapter 7

      22. Dependency theorists in their own words

      23. From modernization to globalization: perspectives on development and social change - J. Timmons Roberts, Amy Hite 2000

        Book Further Andre Gunder Frank 'The Development of Underdevelopment' (1969), pp. 159-168

      24. From modernization to globalization: perspectives on development and social change - J. Timmons Roberts, Amy Hite 2000

        Book Further Fernando Henrique Cardoso, 'Dependency and Development in Latin America', pp. 169-178

      25. Dependency theory today, including a focus on China and Africa

      26. Development theory: an introduction - P. W. Preston 1996

        Book Further pp. 322-323

    4. Week 15. Transformation in Pacific Asia 35 items
      1. Learning outcome:  To understand ideas about the role of the state in development with reference to economic takeoff in Pacific-Asia and the model of the developmental state

      2. Essential reading 4 items
        These readings will orientate you in terms of the key issues in relation to economic take-off in Pacific-Asia and debates about the developmental state.
        1. Understanding development: issues and debates - Paul Hopper 2012

          Book Essential pp.41-45 and 229-232

        2. Compressed Development. - D Hugh Whittaker 2010

          Article Essential

      3. Group 1 Presentation task and reading 2 items
        1. Read the two extracts from Samuel Huntington's writing below.  Prepare a presentation (1) documenting some of Huntington's key points (2) exploring how well his ideas have stood the test of time; and (3) commenting on any underlying assumptions you might want to take issue with.  Note, while you are welcome to draw on other readings in your presentation, articulating your 'intuitive' or 'general knowledge' take on the second and third parts of the presentation is acceptable.

        2. Presentation reading 1 item
          1. From modernization to globalization: perspectives on development and social change - J. Timmons Roberts, Amy Hite 2000

            Book  Samuel Huntington 'The Change to Change' (1971) and 'Political Order in Changing Societies (1968), pp. 144-156

      4. Group 2 Presentation task and reading 2 items
        1. Read the extract from Andre Gunder Frank's writing below.  Prepare a presentation (1) documenting some of Frank's key points (2) exploring how well his ideas have stood the test of time; and (3) commenting on any underlying assumptions you might want to take issue with.  Note, while you are welcome to draw on other readings in your presentation, articulating your 'intuitive' or 'general knowledge' take on the second and third parts of the presentation is acceptable.

        2. Presentation reading 1 item
          1. From modernization to globalization: perspectives on development and social change - J. Timmons Roberts, Amy Hite 2000

            Book  Andre Gunder Frank 'The Development of Underdevelopment' (1969), pp. 159-168

      5. Further reading 26 items
        These readings allow you to go in deeper with reference to the developmental state. Note also, there are readings on China and Vietnam today, reference the question as to whether these two countries should be viewed as developmental states.
        1. Classic texts

        2. Asia's next giant: South Korea and late industrialization - Alice H. Amsden 1989

          Book Further

        3. Embedded autonomy: states and industrial transformation - Peter Evans c1995

          Book Further

        4. Kicking away the ladder: development strategy in historical perspective - Ha-Joon Chang 2002

          Book Further

        5. Other debates on developmentalism

        6. Political economy and the changing global order - Richard Stubbs, Geoffrey R. D. Underhill 2006

          Book Further Mark Beeson, 'Politics and markets in East Asia: Is the developmental state compatible with globalisation?, pp. 443-453

        7. Are China and Vietnam developmental states?

        8. Vietnam: rethinking the state - Martin Gainsborough 2010

          Book 

    5. Week 16. Neo-liberalism I. Structural Adjustment 19 items
      1. Learning outcome:  To understand the key tenets of early neo-liberalism, why it arose, and debates about its consequences for the global south

      2. Essential reading 4 items
        These readings will orientate you in terms of the rise of neo-liberalism with the focus on its early 'Washington Consensus' variant. There is also a reading scrutinising the effects of 'structural adjustment' in Africa
        1. Understanding development: issues and debates - Paul Hopper 2012

          Book Essential pp. 39-41

        2. Globalization and the postcolonial world: the new political economy of development - Ankie M. M. Hoogvelt 2001

          Book Essential Chapter 8

      3. Further reading 14 items
        1. Structural adjustment, accounts mainly written at the time

        2. Assessing Adjustment in Africa - Paul Moseley et al 1995

          Article Further

        3. Critical and other perspectives on neo-liberalism

        4. Understanding development: issues and debates - Paul Hopper 2012

          Book Further Chapter 6. See also pp. 15-23 for a useful review of literature exploring the contested relationship between neo-liberalism and inequality.

        5. From modernization to globalization: perspectives on development and social change - J. Timmons Roberts, Amy Hite 2000

          Book Further Philip McMichael, Globalisation: Myths and Realities (1996), pp.274-291

        6. From modernization to globalization: perspectives on development and social change - J. Timmons Roberts, Amy Hite 2000

          Book Further Alejandros Portes, 'Neoliberalism and the Sociology of Development: Emerging Trends and Unanticipated Facts' (1997), pp. 274-291

        7. Development theory: an introduction - P. W. Preston 1996

          Book Further Chapter 14

        8. Global transformations: politics, economics and culture - David Held, David Held 1999

          Book  See p. 12 on causation for ideas which can be applied for thinking about how we explain the rise of neo-liberalism

    6. Week 17. Neo-liberalism II. State building and Governance 45 items
      1. Learning outcome:  To understand the principal characteristics of the governance agenda in development, why it emerged, and its potential strengths and weaknesses

      2. Essential reading 4 items
        These readings give you a flavour of second stage or Post-Washington Consensus neo-liberalism from quite diverse perspectives. There is also a reading on the challenges and complications of anti-corruption efforts, which were (are) a key element in the governance agenda of this era.
        1. The new development economics: after the Washington Consensus - Ben Fine, Jomo Kwame Sundaram 2006

          Book Essential Elisa Van Waeyenberge, 'From Washington to Post-Washington Consensus', pp. 21-45

        2. Understanding development: issues and debates - Paul Hopper 2012

          Book Essential Chapter 5

      3. Further reading 40 items
        These readings allow you to explore further issues and debates around Post-Washington Consensus neo-liberalism. Note there are quite a lot of readings exploring its (contested) impact on the ground in the global south. There are also readings on so-called 'failed states' which received a lot of attention in this period and additional readings on the topic of corruption.
        1. The rise of the Post-Washington Consensus

        2. The new development economics: after the Washington Consensus - Ben Fine, Jomo Kwame Sundaram 2006

          Book Further Ben Fine, 'The New Development Economics', pp. 1-20

        3. Critical and other perspectives on the post-Washington Consensus

        4. Neo-liberalism and local realities in Asia and Africa

        5. Privatising the state - Béatrice Hibou 2004

          Book  Various chapters, especially ones on Africa

        6. Renegotiating boundaries: local politics in post-Suharto Indonesia - Henk Schulte Nordholt, Geert Arend van Klinken 2007

          Book  Especially section 'Shadow states and the Black Economy'

        7. Cambodia – Donor Playground? - Adam Fforde, Katrin Seidel 03/2015

          Article 

        8. Failed and fragile states

        9. State-building: theory and practice - Aidan Hehir, Neil Robinson 2007

          Book 

        10. Development, security and unending war: governing the world of peoples - Mark R. Duffield 2007

          Book  'Fragile states and native administration', pp. 159-183

        11. Corruption and development

        12. The new development economics: after the Washington Consensus - Ben Fine, Jomo Kwame Sundaram 2006

          Book  Mushtaq Khan, Corruption and governance, pp. 200-221

        13. Corruption and development - Mark Robinson, European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes 1998

          Book  Mushtaq Khan, Patron-Client Networks and the Economic Effects of Corruption in Asia, pp. 15-39

        14. Business and the state in developing countries - Sylvia Maxfield, Ben Ross Schneider 1997

          Book  Richard F Doner and Ansil Ramsay, Competitive Clientelism and Economic Governance: The Case of Thailand, 237-276

        15. Everyday life and the state - Peter Bratsis c2006

          Book  See 'Political Corruption as Symptom of the Public Fetish; or Rules of Separation and Illusions of Purity in Bourgeois Societies', pp. 51-74

    7. Week 18. Reading Week 0 items
    8. Week 19. Post-development, civil society and NGOs 39 items
      1. Learning outcome: To understand the key ideas of post-development writers and whether their critcisms of mainstream development are justified and/or helpful, along with debates about the role of civil society/NGOs in development

      2. Essential reading 4 items
        These readings are to enable you to get your bearings on post-development, including writers who are sympathetic to its ideas and those who are not. Note also there is a reading on civil society and development in South East Asia as a means to get you thinking about some of the complexities around civil society's role in development.
        1. Exploring post-development: theory and practice, problems and perspectives - Aram Ziai, MyiLibrary 2007 (electronic resource)

          Book  'Development discourse and its critics: An introduction to post-development', pp. 3-17.

        2. Understanding development: issues and debates - Paul Hopper 2012

          Book  Chapter 7

      3. Group 3 Presentation task and reading 5 items
        1. How do you explain the shift from the Washington to the Post-Washington Consensus?  Prepare a presentation setting out some possibilities.  Make sure you incorporate some discussion of how one might characterise the shift as this is crucial to the kind of explanation scholars tend to favour.  Look at the readings below to help guide your thinking.

        2. The new development economics: after the Washington Consensus - Ben Fine, Jomo Kwame Sundaram 2006

          Book  Ben Fine, 'The New Development Economics', pp. 1-20

      4. Group 4 Presentation task and reading 4 items
        1. Prepare a presentation looking at revisionist arguments about the relationship between so-called 'corruption' and development.  Look at the readings below to help guide your thinking and incorporate your considered reaction as a group to their arguments.

      5. Further reading 25 items
        The reading below covers the two areas touched on above (i.e. post-development, on the one hand, and civil society and development, on the other) plus one more area, namely readings which reflect on the stratagems of northern NGOs.
        1. Post-development

        2. Globalization and the postcolonial world: the new political economy of development - Ankie M. M. Hoogvelt 2001

          Book  Chapter 11

        3. Critical development theory: contributions to a new paradigm - Ronaldo Munck, Denis O'Hearn c1999

          Book  Various chapters but see especially chapter by Vincent Tucker

        4. The post-development reader - Majid Rahnema, Victoria Bawtree 1997

          Book 

        5. Reflections on the stratagems of northern NGOs

        6. Development, security and unending war: governing the world of peoples - Mark R. Duffield 2007

          Book  Chapters 2,4 and 5

        7. Participation: the new tyranny? - Bill Cooke, Uma Kothari, Bill Cooke 2001

          Book 

        8. Keepers of the flame: understanding Amnesty International - Stephen Hopgood 2006

          Book 

        9. The politics of civil society in the south

        10. Civil society in Southeast Asia - Hock Guan Lee 2004

          Book 

        11. Routledge handbook of Southeast Asian politics 2014

          Book  Chapters 15 and 16

        12. Renegotiating boundaries: local politics in post-Suharto Indonesia - Henk Schulte Nordholt, Geert Arend van Klinken 2007

          Book  Section titled 'How civil is civil society', pp. 307-386.

        13. Society, state and market: a guide to competing theories of development - John Martinussen 1997

          Book  Chapters 20-24

    9. Week 20. International aid: old and new donors 24 items
      1. Learning outcome: To understand the diversity of agencies and actors which comprise the aid industry, and to consider what they do, their rationale and impact

      2. Essential reading 4 items
        These readings will allow you to orientate yourself with reference to debates about international aid. Note also that the reading by Laura Hammond is to help us think about aid beyond Western donors.
        1. Understanding development: issues and debates - Paul Hopper 2012

          Book  Chapter 8

      3. Further reading 19 items
        These readings cover three areas: some of the key writers on aid; critical perspectives on aid; and non-Western aid.
        1. Big names on aid

        2. The end of poverty: how we can make it happen in our lifetime - Jeffrey Sachs 2005

          Book 

        3. Other perspectives on aid

        4. Cambodia – Donor Playground? - Adam Fforde, Katrin Seidel 03/2015

          Article 

        5. The power of whiteness: racism in Third World development and aid - Paulette Goudge 2003

          Book  Introduction

        6. Non-Western aid systems

        7. Famine in Somalia: competing imperatives, collective failures, 2011-12 - Daniel G. Maxwell, Oxford Scholarship Online (Online service) 2016

          Book  Chapter 8

    10. Week 21. Development since the 2000s: Global crisis, inclusive growth & SDGs 31 items
      1. Learning outcome: To understand ways in which we might consider issues of continued evolution of development thinking since the Post-Washington Consensus being alert to areas of continuity as well as change

      2. Essential reading 5 items
        These writings allow you to think about new (and not so new) currents in development thinking and practice since the 2000s. This includes ideas about inclusive growth, the MDGs and the SDGs, and a writing on the so-called BRICS.
      3. Group 5 Presentation task and reading 2 items
        Prepare a presentation comparing the ideas of Mark Duffield and De Renzio and Seifert on international aid, considering where they complement or contradict each other and who you find most convincing and why. Base your presentation around the two readings below.
      4. Group 6 Presentation task and reading 3 items
        1. Prepare a presentation comparing the ideas of Bjoicic-Dzelilovic and Hanlon on international aid, considering where they complement or contradict each other and who you find most convincing and why.  Base your presentation around the two readings below.

                              

      5. Further reading 13 items
        Here you will find additional readings covering the areas begun in the essential readings, including reflections on the global financial crisis of 2008, inclusive growth, the MDGs/SDGs, the BRICS and post-neo-liberalism.
        1. Global financial crisis/inclusive growth

        2. MDGs/SDGs

      6. BRICS

      7. Post-Neo-liberalism

    11. Easter Vacation 0 items
    12. Week 22. Environmental Politics 19 items
      1. Learning outcome:  To consider debates in the environmental movement from green growth to degrowth and critically assess their impact on the development project

      2. Essential reading 4 items
        These readings introduce you to some of the debates in environmental politics, including in particular ideas in the green growth and degrowth paradigms. The Gainsborough article considers ways we might move beyond the green growth vs degrowth debate.
        1. Understanding development: issues and debates - Paul Hopper 2012

          Book  Chapter 9

        2. Degrowth: a vocabulary for a new era 2015

          Book  Especially introduction

      3. Further reading 14 items
        These readings offer scope to explore further the ideas raised in the essential readings. The Degrowth book (i.e. the first item below) is useful for getting a window onto all the various grassroots initiatives which are bubbling up which collectively can be seen as striving for a new economic model.
        1. Degrowth: a vocabulary for a new era 2015

          Book  Any of the chapters, depending on your interest.

        2. Prosperity without growth: economics for a finite planet - Tim Jackson 2009

          Book 

        3. Parallax of growth: the philosophy of ecology and economy - Ole Bjerg, Ole Bjerg 2016

          Book 

        4. The production of money: how to break the power of bankers - Ann Pettifor, Ann Pettifor 2017

          Book 

        5. The politics of actually existing unsustainability: human flourishing in a climate-changed, carbon-constrained world - John Barry, Oxford Scholarship Online (Online service), John Barry 2012 (electronic resource)

          Book 

    13. Week 23. What future for the development project? 19 items
      1. Learning outcome:  To revist the question of how we consider the teaching and practice of development in order to understand the consequences of different courses of action and inaction

      2. Essential reading 4 items
        Here we are especially interested in reading which goes beyond thinking about development as something pertaining to the global south and instead offers us conceptual tools to see development as a universal problematic.
        1. Understanding development: issues and debates - Paul Hopper 2012

          Book  Conclusion

      3. Further reading 14 items
        1. Globalization and the postcolonial world: the new political economy of development - Ankie M. M. Hoogvelt 2001

          Book  Conclusion

        2. Development, security and unending war: governing the world of peoples - Mark R. Duffield 2007

          Book  Chapters 8 and 9

        3. The Consumerism-Development-Security Nexus - Vanessa Pupavac, Vanessa Pupavac 12/2010

          Article 

        4. Agenda 2030: The UK Government's approach to delivering the Global Goals for Sustainable Development at Home and Abroad

          Document  This is a big document. Just browse it, looking in particular at how the UK government articulates the domestic challenges stemming from the SDGs as opposed to the international ones.

        5. Powers of freedom: reframing political thought - Nikolas S. Rose, Nikolas Rose 1999

          Book 

        6. The imagined economies of globalization - Angus Cameron, Ronen Palan, Angus Cameron and Ronen Palan 2004

          Book 

        7. The inclusive society?: social exclusion and New Labour - Ruth Levitas, dawsonera, Ruth Levitas 2005 (electronic resource)

          Book 

        8. Urban outcasts: a comparative sociology of advanced marginality - Loïc J. D. Wacquant, Loic Wacquant 2008

          Book 

        9. Chavs: the demonization of the working class - Owen Jones, Owen Jones 2011

          Book 

        10. The spirit level: why equality is better for everyone - Richard G. Wilkinson, Kate Pickett, Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett 2010

          Book 

        11. How much is enough?: money and the good life - Robert Skidelsky, Edward Skidelsky, Robert and Edward Skidelsky 2012

          Book 

        12. Together: the rituals, pleasures and politics of co-operation - Richard Sennett, Richard Sennett 2013

          Book 

        13. Oligarchy - Jeffrey A. Winters, Jeffrey Winters 2011

          Book 

    14. Appendix A 1 item
      1. Instructions on how to submit essays electronically

         

        1.     Log in to Blackboard and select the Blackboard course for the unit you are submitting work for. If you cannot see it, please e-mail spais-ug@bristol.ac.uk with you username and ask to be added.

        2.     Click on the "Submit Work Here" option at the top on the left hand menu and then find the correct assessment from the list.

        3.     Select 'view/complete' for the appropriate piece of work.  It is your responsibility to ensure that you have selected both the correct unit and the correct piece of work.

        4.     The screen will display 'single file upload' and your name. Enter your name (for FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS ONLY) or candidate number (for SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS ONLY) as a submission title, and then select the file that you wish to upload by clicking the 'browse' button. Click on the 'upload' button at the bottom.

        5.     You will then be shown the essay to be submitted. Check that you have selected the correct essay and click the 'Submit' button.  This step must be completed or the submission is not complete.

        6.     You will be informed of a successful submission. A digital receipt is displayed on screen and a copy sent to your email address for your records.

         

        Important notes

        ·          You are only allowed to submit one file to Blackboard (single file upload), so ensure that all parts of your work – references, bibliography etc. – are included in one single document and that you upload the correct version. You will not be able to change the file once you have uploaded.

        ·          Blackboard will accept a variety of file formats, but the School can only accept work submitted in .rtf (Rich Text Format) or .doc/.docx (Word Document) format. If you use another word processing package, please ensure you save in a compatible format.

        ·          By submitting your essay, you are confirming that you have read the regulations on plagiarism and confirm that the submission is not plagiarised. You also confirm that the word count stated on the essay is an accurate statement of essay length.

        ·          If Blackboard is not working email your assessment to spais-ug@bristol.ac.uk with the unit code and title in the subject line.

         

        How to confirm that your essay has been submitted

         

        ·          You will have received a digital receipt by email and If you click on the assessment again (steps 1-4), you will see the title and submission date of the essay you have submitted. If you click on submit, you will not be able to submit again. This table also displays the date of submission. If you click on the title of the essay, it will open in a new window and you can also see what time the essay was submitted.

    15. Appendix B 1 item
      1. Summary of Relevant School Regulations (Further information is in the year handbook)

         

        Attendance at classes

        SPAIS takes attendance and participation in classes very seriously.  Seminars form an essential part of your learning and you need to make sure you arrive on time, have done the required reading and participate fully.  Attendance at all seminars is monitored, with absence only condoned in cases of illness or for other exceptional reasons.

         

        If you are unable to attend a seminar you must inform your seminar tutor, as well as email spais-absence@bristol.ac.uk.  You should also provide evidence to explain your absence, such as a self-certification and/or medical note, counselling letter or other official document.   If you are unable to provide evidence then please still email spais-absence@bristol.ac.uk to explain why you are unable to attend.  If you are ill or are experiencing some other kind of difficulty which is preventing you from attending seminars for a prolonged period, please inform your personal tutor, the Undergraduate Office or the Student Administration Manager.

         

        Requirements for credit points

        In order to be awarded credit points for the unit, you must achieve:

        ·          Satisfactory attendance in classes, or satisfactory completion of catch up work in lieu of poor attendance

        ·          Satisfactory formative assessment

        ·          An overall mark of 40 or above in the summative assessment/s. In some circumstances, a mark of 35 or above can be awarded credit points.

         

        Presentation of written work

        Coursework must be word-processed.  As a guide, use a clear, easy-to-read font such as Arial or Times New Roman, in at least 11pt. You may double–space or single–space your essays as you prefer. Your tutor will let you know if they have a preference.

         

        All pages should be numbered.

         

        Ensure that the essay title appears on the first page.

         

        All pages should include headers containing the following information:

         

        Formative work

        Summative work

        Name: e.g. Joe Bloggs

        Unit e.g. SOCI10004

        Seminar Tutor e.g. Dr J. Haynes

        Word Count .e.g. 1500 words

         

        **Candidate Number**: e.g. 12345

        Unit: e.g. SOCI10004

        Seminar Tutor: e.g. Dr J. Haynes

        Word Count: e.g. 3000 words

         

        Candidate numbers are required on summative work in order to ensure that marking is anonymous. Note that your candidate number is not the same as your student number.

         

        Assessment Length

        Each piece of coursework must not exceed the stipulated maximum length for the assignment (the 'word count') listed in the unit guide.  Summative work that exceeds the maximum length will be subject to penalties.  The word count is absolute (there is no 10% leeway, as commonly rumoured). Five marks will be deducted for every 100 words or part thereof over the word limit. Thus, an essay that is 1 word over the word limit will be penalised 5 marks; an essay that is 101 words over the word limit will be penalised 10 marks, and so on.

         

        The word count includesall text, numbers, footnotes/endnotes, Harvard referencing in the body of the text and direct quotes. It excludes, the title, candidate number, bibliography, and appendices.  However, appendices should only be used for reproducing documents, not additional text written by you.

         

        Referencing and Plagiarism

        Where sources are used they must be cited using the Harvard referencing system. Inadequate referencing is likely to result in penalties being imposed. See the Study Skills Guide for advice on referencing and how poor referencing/plagiarism are processed. Unless otherwise stated, essays must contain a bibliography.

         

        Extensions

        Extensions to coursework deadlines will only be granted in exceptional circumstances. If you want to request an extension, complete an extension request form (available at Blackboard/SPAIS_UG Administration/forms to download and School policies) and submit the form with your evidence (e.g. self-certification, medical certificate, death certificate, or hospital letter) to Catherine Foster in the Undergraduate Office.

         

        Extension requests cannot be submitted by email, and will not be considered if there is no supporting evidence. If you are waiting for evidence then you can submit the form and state that it has been requested.

         

        All extension requests should be submitted at least 72 hours prior to the assessment deadline. If the circumstance occurs after this point, then please either telephone or see the Student Administration Manager in person. In their absence you can contact Catherine Foster in the UG Office, again in person or by telephone. 

         

        Extensions can only be granted by the Student Administration Manager.They cannot be granted by unit convenors or seminar tutors.

         

        You will receive an email to confirm whether your extension request has been granted.

         

         

        Submitting Essays

         

        Formative essays

        Summative essays

         

        Unless otherwise stated, all formative essay submissions must be submitted electronically via Blackboard

         

        All summative essay submissions must be submitted electronically via Blackboard.

         

        Electronic copies enable an efficient system of receipting, providing the student and the School with a record of exactly when an essay was submitted. It also enables the School to systematically check the length of submitted essays and to safeguard against plagiarism.

         

         

        Late Submissions

        Penalties·          The 24 hour period runs from the deadline for submission, and includes Saturdays, Sundays, bank holidays and university closure days.

        ·          If an essay submitted less than one week late fails solely due to the imposition of a late penalty, then the mark will be capped at 40.

        ·          If a fail due to non-submission is recorded, you will have the opportunity to submit the essay as a second attempt for a capped mark of 40 in order to receive credit points for the unit.

         

        Marks and Feedback

        In addition to an overall mark, students will receive written feedback on their assessed work.

        The process of marking and providing detailed feedback is a labour-intensive one, with most 2-3000 word essays taking at least half an hour to assess and comment upon. Summative work also needs to be checked for plagiarism and length and moderated by a second member of staff to ensure marking is fair and consistent. For these reasons, the University regulations are that feedback will be returned to students within three weeks of the submission deadline.

        If work is submitted late, then it may not be possible to return feedback within the three week period.

         

        Fails and Resits

        If you fail the unit overall, you will normally be required to resubmit or resit.  In units where there are two pieces of summative assessment, you will normally only have to re-sit/resubmit the highest-weighted piece of assessment.

         

        Exam resits only take place once a year, in late August/early September.  If you have to re-sit an exam then you will need to be available during this period. If you are not available to take a resit examination, then you will be required to take a supplementary year in order to retake the unit.

    16. Appendix C 2 items
      1. Level 5 Marking and Assessment Criteria (Second Year)

        1st (70+)

        o    Excellent knowledge and understanding of the subject and understanding of theoretical & methodological issues

        o    A coherent argument that is logically structured and supported by evidence

        o    Demonstrates a capacity for intellectual initiative/ independent thought and an ability to engage with the material critically

        o    Use of appropriate material from a range of sources extending beyond the reading list

        o    High quality organisation and style of presentation (including referencing); minimal grammatical or spelling errors; written in a fluent and engaging style

        2:1 (60–69)

        o    Very good knowledge and understanding of the subject and displays awareness of underlying theoretical and methodological issues

        o    A generally critical, analytical argument that is reasonably well structured and well-supported

        o    Some critical capacity to see the implications of the question, though not able to 'see beyond the question' enough to develop an independent approach

        o    Some critical knowledge of relevant literature; use of works beyond the prescribed reading list; demonstrating some ability to be selective in the range of material used and to synthesise rather than describe

        o    Well presented: no significant grammatical or spelling errors; written clearly and concisely; fairly consistent referencing and bibliographic formatting

        2:2 (50–59)

        o    Good comprehension of the subject, though there may be some errors and/or gaps, and some awareness of underlying theoretical/methodological issues with little understanding of how they relate to the question

        o    Capacity for argument is limited with a tendency to assert/state opinion rather than argue on the basis of reason and evidence; structure may not be evident

        o    Tendency to be descriptive rather than critical, but some  attempt at analysis

        o    Some attempt to go beyond or criticise the 'essential reading' for the unit; displaying limited capacity to discern between relevant and non-relevant material

        o    Adequately presented: writing style conveys meaning but is sometimes awkward; some significant grammatical and spelling errors; inconsistent referencing but generally accurate bibliography

        3rd (40–49)

        o    Limited knowledge and understanding with significant errors and omissions and generally ignorant or confused awareness of key theoretical/ methodological issues

        o    Largely misses the point of the question, asserts rather than argues a case; underdeveloped or chaotic structure; evidence mentioned but used inappropriately or incorrectly

        o    Very little attempt at analysis or synthesis, tending towards excessive description.

        o    Limited, uncritical and generally confused account of a narrow range of sources

        o    Satisfactorily presented: but not always easy to follow; frequent grammatical and spelling errors; limited attempt at providing references (e.g. only referencing direct quotations) and containing bibliographic omissions

        Marginal Fail (35–39)

        o    Shows very limited understanding and knowledge of the subject and/or misses the point of the question

        o    Incoherent or illogical structure; evidence used inappropriately or incorrectly.

        o    Unsatisfactory analytical skills

        o    Limited, uncritical and generally confused account of a very narrow range of sources.

        o    Unsatisfactory presentation e.g. not always easy to follow; frequent grammatical and spelling errors and limited or no attempt at providing references and containing bibliographic omissions

        Outright Fail (0–34)

        o    Shows little or no knowledge and understanding of the subject, no awareness of key theoretical/ methodological issues and/or fails to address the question

        o    Unsuccessful or no attempt to construct an argument and an incoherent or

        illogical structure; evidence used inappropriately or incorrectly

        o    Very poor analytical skills

        o    Limited, uncritical and generally confused account of a very narrow range of sources.

        o    Very poor quality of presentation and limited or no attempt at providing

        references and containing bibliographic omissions

         

         

         

         

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