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  1. Week 1 - Overview of the Course and the Foundations of Social Justice 20 items
    This first week will provide a brief overview of the course, and an opportunity to get to know one another. We will also consider why it might be important to think about global ethics. Finally, we will begin to explore the foundations of social justice many cosmopolitan global justice scholars rely on: the work of John Rawls. It is important to understand these foundations before we begin to discuss how justice can be ‘globalized.’ Key questions to consider this week include: why should we think normatively about global matters? Is a ‘global ethics’ possible? What principles underwrite a condition of justice according to Rawls? What would a just outcome look like under his model? How has Rawls attempted to ‘globalize’ his theory of justice?
    1. Essential Reading 2 items
    2. Recommended Reading 18 items
      1. Ethics and world politics - Duncan Bell 2010

        Book 

      2. John Rawls' theory of social justice: an introduction - Gene Blocker, Elizabeth H. Smith 1980

        Book 

      3. The Cambridge companion to Rawls - Samuel Richard Freeman, Cambridge Collections Online (Online service) c2006 (electronic resource)

        Book 

      4. Rawls' Theory of Justice--II - R. M. Hare, John Rawls 07/1973

        Article 

      5. Global politics - Andrew Heywood 2014

        Book 

      6. Rawls's law of peoples: a realistic utopia? - Rex Martin, David A. Reidy 2006

        Book 

      7. Rawls on Justice - Thomas Nagel 04/1973

        Article 

      8. A theory of justice - John Rawls c1971

        Book 

      9. The philosophy of Rawls - Henry S. Richardson, Paul J. Weithman 1999

        Book 

      10. Rawls' Theory of Justice - Thomas M. Scanlon 05/1973

        Article 

  2. Week 2 - Cosmopolitan Global Justice 16 items
    This week, we examine cosmopolitan accounts that attempt to expand Rawls’ theory of justice to the global level. In addition, we will critically assess the debate on relational and non-relational justice and what it might reveal about the scope of justice beyond borders. Key questions to consider this week include: how does globalization broaden the scope of justice to the global level? Do we owe a duty of justice to those we are not in social ‘relations’ with? If so, what grounds this duty of justice? Is the debate a moral or empirical one?
    1. Essential Reading 3 items
    2. Recommended Reading 13 items
      1. Chapter 9 - International Society from a Cosmopolitan Perspective

        Chapter 

      2. Global Egalitarianism - Chris Armstrong 01/2009

        Article 

      3. Political theory and international relations - Charles R. Beitz 1979

        Book 

      4. Global Justice - Charles Jones 12/04/2001

        Book 

      5. Global justice - Jon Mandle 2006

        Book 

      6. Cosmopolitan justice - Darrel Moellendorf c2002

        Book 

      7. Global justice - Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge 2001

        Book 

      8. Global justice: seminal essays, Vol. I: Global responsibilities - Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge, Darrel Moellendorf 2008

        Book 

      9. Justice without Borders: Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism, and Patriotism - Kok-Chor Tan, Cambridge Books Online (Online service) 2004 (electronic resource)

        Book 

  3. Week 3 - Critics and Cosmopolitan Responses 24 items
    This week, we will focus key critics of global justice. Critics provide several reasons why justice does not apply beyond borders, and it is important to understand these. We will also examine key responses to the critics of global justice, in order to demonstrate the weaknesses of these critics. Key questions to consider this week include: does justice require a sense of national solidarity? Is it possible to have duties of justice without the global institutional mechanisms in place to enforce those duties? Does the fact that the world is made up of a plurality of national cultures support the need for a condition of global justice? Does national self-determinism require a condition of global justice in order to be reasonably feasible in a modern globalized world? Is it possible to be both a ‘patriot’ to one’s state and a cosmopolitan dedicated to fostering a condition of global justice?
    1. Essential Reading 3 items
      1. Critics 2 items
      2. Cosmopolitan Responses 1 item
    2. Recommended Reading 21 items
      1. Critics 12 items
        1. National Self-Determination - Avishai Margalit, Joseph Raz 09/1990

          Article 

        2. The morality of nationalism - Robert McKim, Jeff McMahan 1997

          Book 

        3. Citizenship and national identity - David Miller 2000

          Book 

        4. On Nationality - David Miller 09/10/1997

          Book 

        5. Liberal nationalism - Yael Tamir, dawsonera 1993

          Book 

      2. Cosmopolitan Responses 9 items
        1. Cosmopolitanism: ethics in a world of strangers - Anthony Appiah c2006

          Book 

        2. Visions of World Community - Jens Bartelson, Cambridge Books Online (Online service) 2009 (electronic resource)

          Book 

        3. Global justice: a cosmopolitan account - Gillian Brock, Oxford Scholarship Online (Online service) 2009 (electronic resource)

          Book 

  4. Week 4 - Global Governance 16 items
    This week, we will critically assess the changing nature of global politics and global governance, and examine whether it would be possible for institutions to satisfy the conditions of global justice if they were appropriately altered. Key question to consider this week include: are traditional forms of multilateral global governance able to resolve the growing ‘collective action problems’ presented by globalization and interconnected global cohabitation? What alternatives are there to more integrated global governance models based on principles of global justice? Do we need cosmopolitan democracy to implement global justice? Is a more globally just form of global politics possible?
    1. Essential Reading 3 items
    2. Recommended Reading 13 items
      1. Cosmopolitanism and international relations theory - Richard Beardsworth 2011

        Book 

      2. Cosmopolitan global politics - Patrick Hayden c2005

        Book 

      3. Governing globalization: power, authority and global governance - David Held, Anthony G. McGrew 2002

        Book 

      4. Global democracy - Torbjörn Tännsjö 2008

        Book 

  5. Week 5 - Poverty 18 items
    This week, we consider the issue of global poverty. We pay special attention to the unjust global structures that perpetuate this global cohabitation problem. We will discuss the role of various actors, including ourselves as privileged individuals. Key questions to consider this week include: how does the global economic order help to perpetuate acute inequalities in wealth and life chances? Do global economic structures establish a form of relational global justice? If not, do we still have duties of justice to alleviate global poverty? Is a duty of global justice against poverty best expressed in terms of capabilities, basic needs, sufficiency, rights, primary goods and/or neo-liberal models for economic development? Note – Thomas Pogge, a key poverty scholar, has been removed from the essential reading list due to ongoing allegations of sexual harassment and assault against him. These allegations are serious, and part of a wider problem of sexual misconduct in academia (https://www.theguardian.com/education/2017/mar/05/students-staff-uk-universities-sexual-harassment-epidemic). You will find his work in the recommended reading list, but reading his work is not compulsory. If anyone would like to discuss this further, please see me in my office hour or email me.
    1. Essential Reading 2 items
      Note – Thomas Pogge, a key poverty scholar, has been removed from the essential reading list due to ongoing allegations of sexual harassment and assault against him. These allegations are serious, and part of a wider problem of sexual misconduct in academia (https://www.theguardian.com/education/2017/mar/05/students-staff-uk-universities-sexual-harassment-epidemic). You will find his work in the recommended reading list, but reading his work is not compulsory. If anyone would like to discuss this further, please see me in my office hour or email me.
    2. Recommended Reading 16 items
      1. Chapter 9 - Extreme Poverty in a Wealthy World: What Justice Demands Today

        Chapter 

      2. Valuing freedoms: Sen's capability approach and poverty reduction - Sabina Alkire, Oxford Scholarship Online (Online service) 2002 (electronic resource)

        Book 

      3. Chapter 2 - Poverty as a Violation of Human Rights: Inhumanity or Injustice?

        Chapter 

      4. Chapter 11 - Global Poverty and Human Rights: The Case for Positive Duties

        Chapter 

      5. Politics as usual: what lies behind the pro-poor rhetoric - Thomas Pogge 2010

        Book 

      6. World poverty and human rights: cosmopolitan responsibilities and reforms - Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge 2008

        Book 

      7. The end of poverty: how we can make it happen in our lifetime - Jeffrey Sachs 2005

        Book 

      8. Development as freedom - Amartya Sen 1999

        Book 

      9. The life you can save: how to do your part to end world poverty - Peter Singer 2010

        Book 

      10. Chapter 10 - Responsibility and Severe Poverty

        Chapter 

  6. Week 7 - Climate Change 17 items
    This week, we focus on climate change and its relationship to debates about global justice. We will discuss the key elements of the climate change problem (causes and consequences), the main reasons for continuing inaction, and consider the ethical aspects of the problem. Key questions to consider this week include: is climate change a problem of global justice? How much do we owe to future generations, and why? Who should be responsible for climate change - states, individuals or other actors? How might we think about distributing burdens across these actors (ability to pay, polluter pays, or both)?
    1. Essential Reading 3 items
    2. Recommended Reading 14 items
      1. A Perfect Moral Storm - Stephen M. Gardiner 04/05/2011

        Book 

      2. Climate ethics: essential readings - Stephen Mark Gardiner, dawsonera 2010 (electronic resource)

        Book 

      3. Justice for future generations: climate change and international law - Peter Lawrence 2014

        Book 

  7. Week 8 - Health 21 items
    This week, we turn our attention to global health. Although there have been many arguments for ‘health justice’ at the national level, it is only recently that scholars have turned their attention to issues of global health and its relationship to issues of global justice. We will examine some of these recent arguments for global health justice and to determine what global responsibilities for health may exist, if at all. Key question to consider this week include: how does globalization impact on global health? Is global health a matter of global justice? Is health a prerequisite for human agency? Is health a prerequisite for one’s capability to lead a ‘flourishing life’? Does it make sense to speak in terms of a ‘right to health’?
    1. Essential Reading 2 items
    2. Recommended Reading 19 items
      1. Health and globalization - Geoffrey B. Cockerham, William C. Cockerham 2010

        Book 

      2. Just health: meeting health needs fairly - Norman Daniels, dawsonera c2008 (electronic resource)

        Book 

      3. Global politics of health - Sara Ellen Davies 2012

        Book 

      4. Health Inequalities and Global Justice - Patti Tamara Lenard, Christine Straehle, Cambridge Books Online (Online service) 2013 (electronic resource)

        Book 

      5. Ethics and AIDS: compassion and justice in global crisis - Kenneth R. Overberg 2006

        Book 

      6. Social justice: the moral foundations of public health and health policy - Madison Powers, Ruth R. Faden 2006

        Book 

      7. Health, luck, and justice - Shlomi Segall, dawsonera 2009

        Book 

      8. Health justice: an argument from the capabilities approach - Sridhar Venkatapuram 2011

        Book 

      9. Global health governance - Jeremy R. Youde 2012

        Book 

  8. Week 9 - Gender Inequality and Labor Rights 18 items
    This week, we focus on cosmopolitan discussions of gender inequality, global production, and labor rights. These are overlapping issues, which is why we tackle them together – but they can also be separated, if you are interested in one issue more than another. Key questions to consider this week include: is gender inequality a matter of global justice? What can a feminist cosmopolitanism tell us about global gender inequalities? What can global justice tell us about global production and international labor rights? Could a social connection model help us to understand these matters more effectively than conventional global justice accounts?
    1. Essential Reading 2 items
    2. Recommended Reading 16 items
      1. Economic globalisation and human rights - Wolfgang Benedek, K. de Feyter, Fabrizio Marrella, European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation 2007 (electronic resource)

        Book 

      2. Globalization and Human Rights - Richard Fairbrother, Robert McCorquodale 1999

        Article 

      3. Gender and cosmopolitanism in Europe: a feminist perspective - Ulrike Vieten c2012

        Book 

      4. Anthropology and the new cosmopolitanism: rooted, feminist and vernacular perspectives - Pnina Werbner, Association of Social Anthropologists, dawsonera 2008 (electronic resource)

        Book 

  9. Week 10 - Humanitarian Intervention 20 items
    This week we focus on the moral dilemmas involved in debates about humanitarian duties to intervene militarily in order to ‘save strangers.’ Humanitarian intervention is especially contentious for cosmopolitans, as there seems to be an intuitive appeal in stopping human rights abuses – and yet the notion of killing to save lives is morally troublesome. Key questions to consider this week include: is there a moral obligation for humanitarian intervention in order to stop large-scale violations of human rights? Can these obligations be framed within the language of duties of global justice? Is it possible to hold a cosmopolitan worldview while not endorsing humanitarian intervention and the use of violence to end violence?
    1. Essential Reading 2 items
    2. Recommended Reading 18 items
      1. Cosmopolitan War - Cécile Fabre 27/09/2012

        Book 

      2. Global civil society: an answer to war - Mary Kaldor 2003

        Book 

      3. Conceiving cosmopolitanism: theory, context and practice - Steven Vertovec, Robin Cohen 2002

        Book 

      4. Humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect: who should intervene? - James Pattison, Oxford Scholarship Online (Online service) 2010 (electronic resource)

        Book 

  10. Week 11 - Migration and Refugees 21 items
    In this final week, we consider the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis, and the question of what to do about refugees more widely. We discuss cosmopolitan models for addressing the refugee crisis, including open borders and global citizenship. Key questions to consider this week include: should refugees be seen as a matter of global justice? Should we admit refugees without restrictions? Is there a case for global citizenship and open borders? Should refugees have a say in where they are relocated, and who they bring with them?
    1. Essential Reading 3 items
    2. Recommended Reading 18 items
      1. Transformations of citizenship - Seyla Benhabib 2001

        Book 

      2. The ethics of immigration - Joseph H. Carens, dawsonera 2013

        Book 

      3. The morality of border crossing - William Smith, Luis Cabrera 2015-2

        Article 

      4. Justice without Borders: Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism, and Patriotism - Kok-Chor Tan, Cambridge Books Online (Online service) 2004 (electronic resource)

        Book 

      5. Debating the ethics of immigration: is there a right to exclude? - Christopher Heath Wellman, Phillip Cole, dawsonera 2011

        Book 

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